Dragon Ball Z Games Ps4

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  1. Ps4 Dragon Ball Z Games Free
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Dragon Ball
Genre(s)Fighting, role-playing
Developer(s)Various
Publisher(s)Bandai
Atari
Bandai Namco Entertainment
Composer(s)Various
Platform(s)Nintendo Entertainment System, Super Nintendo Entertainment System, Sega Genesis, Playdia, PC Engine, Sega Saturn, PlayStation, PlayStation 2, GameCube, PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, Xbox, Xbox 360, Xbox One, Wii, PlayStation Vita, Game Boy Advance, Game Boy Color, WonderSwan Color, Nintendo DS, Nintendo 3DS, Nintendo Switch, PlayStation Portable, LCD game, Mobile Phone, Android, iOS.
First releaseDragon Ball: Dragon Daihikyō
September 27, 1986
Latest releaseDragon Ball Legends
May 18, 2018

The Dragon Ball video game series are based on the manga and anime series of the same name created by Akira Toriyama. The series follows the adventures of Goku as he trains in martial arts and explores the world in search of the seven wish-granting orbs known as the Dragon Balls. The games are of various genres, mostly role-playing, platform and fighting games, although the latter have become the most prominent.

Since 1986, many video games based on the property have been released in Japan, with the majority being produced by Bandai. Most of the dragon ball z games from the 16-bit and 32-bit eras were also localized and released in European countries like France, Spain and Portugal because of the strong following the series already had in those countries. Up until 1997's Dragon Ball GT: Final Bout, none of the Dragon Ball games were localized for the North American market, with the exception of Dragon Power which was graphically altered due to the lack of a license for the franchise.

In 2000, Infogrames acquired the license to produce and release Dragon Ball games for the North American and international market.[1] With the release of their first two titles in the franchise, 2002's Dragon Ball Z: The Legacy of Goku and Dragon Ball Z: Budokai, Infogrames more than doubled their sales.[2] In January 2004, Atari paid $10 million for the exclusive US rights until January 2010.[3] In 2008, Atari announced that over 12.7 million video game units based on the series had been sold since May 2002.[4]Dragon Ball was Atari's top-earning licensed property, earning $85 million in 2005 and accounting for over 49% of their annual revenue in 2008.[5][6] However, with the expiration of the Atari deal in 2009, Namco Bandai Games assumed the North American and European distribution rights, starting with the 2009 releases of Dragon Ball Z: Attack of the Saiyans, Dragon Ball: Raging Blast and Dragon Ball: Revenge of King Piccolo.[7]

By December 2014, over 40 million video games based on the franchise had been sold worldwide.[8] The Dragon Ball Xenoverse series sold a further 10million units between 2015 and 2018,[9] and Dragon Ball FighterZ sold over 3.5million units,[10] bringing software sales to over 53.5million units sold. In addition, the mobile gameDragon Ball Z: Dokkan Battle has exceeded 250million downloads[11] and grossed over $1.6 billion,[12] and the mobile game Dragon Ball Legends has grossed over $140 million.[13] The Dragon Ball video game series has generated over $5 billion in total gross revenue, as of 2018.

  • 1Consoles and PC games

Ps4 Dragon Ball Z Games Free

Consoles and PC games[edit]

1980s[edit]

TitleDetails
Dragon Ball: Dragon Daihikyō

– Super Cassette Vision
Notes:

Dragon Ball: Dragon Daihikyō (ドラゴンボール ドラゴン大秘境Doragon Bōru: Dragon Daihikyō, Dragon Ball: Dragon's Great Exploration) The first Dragon Ball video game ever produced. It was released by Epoch, making it the only game not to feature any kind of involvement with Bandai or the subsequent Namco Bandai. The game is an overhead shoot'em up that allows players to take on the role of Goku who rides on the Nimbus while firing Ki blasts and swatting at enemies with his Power Pole.


Dragon Ball: Shenlong no Nazo
Dragon Power
Dragon Ball: Le Secret du Dragon

  • JP: November 27, 1986[14]
  • NA: March 1988
  • FRA: 1990
  • ESP: 1993
– Famicom (NES)
Notes:
  • Known in Japan as Dragon Ball: Shenlong no Nazo (ドラゴンボール 神龍の謎Doragon Bōru: Shenron no Nazo, Shenlong's Riddle), in Europe as Dragon Ball: Le Secret du Dragon, the game was developed by Tose and released by Bandai in 1986. The game stars Goku and very roughly follows the first two volumes of the Dragon Ballmanga, culminating in the first wish from Shenlong. The game consists of 2D overhead areas where Goku must fight many enemies and side scrolling sequences for the boss fights. It was added as bonus feature in the Japanese release of Dragon Ball: Origins 2 in 2010.
  • In the USA the game is known as Dragon Power. Although the Japanese, French and Spanish editions of the game used the familiar art and music from the Dragon Ballanime, the US version is stated to be based on Journey to the West with no mention of Dragon Ball.[15] Goku was changed to more closely resemble an Americanized Kung Fu stereotype, being pictured on the box with a white gi and blue headband. Master Roshi has been similarly changed to look more like a traditional martial arts master. Bulma is called 'Nora', Yamcha is called 'Lancer', Oolong is called 'Pudgy', Pilaf is called 'King Minos', the Kamehameha is the 'Wind Wave', and the Dragon Balls are referred to as 'Crystalballs'. Also, the game has been shortened; all levels that correspond with the Kung-Fu Tournament halfway through the game have been removed. Furthermore, all perverted references have been censored out; for instance, the 'girl's panties' power-up (which temporarily makes Goku run fast) now resembles a triangle-cut sandwich.
  • The European version, released in France in 1990[16] (and in Spain in late 1993),[17][18] retains the Dragon Ball license and characters for the game albeit with the same censorship found in the American adaptation regarding the perverted content. In France, it was the first NES game translated into French. However this translation includes a lot of misspellings. In Spain, the game was also released in French language, although the Spanish version specifically featured box description and instruction manual translations in Spanish language.



  • JP: August 12, 1988[14]
– Famicom
Notes:

Dragon Ball: Daimaō Fukkatsu (ドラゴンボール大魔王復活Doragon Bōru Daimaō Fukkatsu, lit. Dragon Ball: Great Demon King's Revival) was released in Japan for the Famicom on August 12, 1988 by Bandai. It takes place during the Piccolo Daimao arc. It was one of the first games to have a board game, which included battles using cards. The battle card games are a hybrid of role playing games, board games and trading cards. The players move around a game board and encounter characters on the way. Some characters offer information and others need to be battled. The outcome of each fight is determined by the randomly generated hand of cards players and the opponent are dealt. The player flips over cards in a certain order, and their actions are shown in an animated battle that lasts until one of the characters is defeated.



  • JP: October 27, 1989[14]
– Famicom
Notes:

Dragon Ball 3: Gokūden (ドラゴンボール3 悟空伝Doragon Bōru Surī Gokūden, lit. Dragon Ball 3: Goku's Story) was released by Bandai on October 27, 1989 for the Famicom in Japan. The game relates all of the Dragon Ball story until the fight against Piccolo Junior. The main character is Goku as a child and adult, though Krillin and Yamcha are also playable. A remake was released for the WonderSwan Color in 2002.


1990s[edit]

TitleDetails

  • JP: October 27, 1990[14]
– Famicom
Notes:

Dragon Ball Z: Kyōshū! Saiyan (ドラゴンボールZ 強襲!サイヤ人Doragon Bōru Zetto Kyōshū! Saiyajin, Dragon Ball Z: Fierce Attack! Saiyan) was the first Dragon Ball Z game to be released for the Famicom system. It was released by Bandai on October 27, 1990 in Japan. The game features Raditz, Nappa, Vegeta, two illusion Saiyans who fight Yamcha, Tien, Piccolo, Gohan and Krillin in the anime, and an original who transforms into a Giant Ape.



  • JP: August 10, 1991[14]
– Famicom
Notes:

Dragon Ball Z II: Gekishin Frieza!! (ドラゴンボールZII 激神フリーザ!!Doragon Bōru Zetto Tsū Gekishin Furīza!!, Dragon Ball Z II: Frieza the Planet Destroyer!!) was released by Bandai on August 10, 1991 in Japan for the Famicom. The game features the story on Namek and follows closely to the story in the anime except for the fact that, like in the previous game, Tienshinhan, Yamcha and Chaozu are not dead but are present in the player's party at the beginning.



  • JP: January 25, 1992[14]
– Super Famicom
Notes:

Dragon Ball Z: Super Saiya Densetsu (ドラゴンボールZ 超サイヤ伝説Doragon Bōru Zetto Sūpā Saiya Densetsu, Dragon Ball Z: Legend of the Super Saiyan) is the first Dragon Ball game for the Super Famicom. It is a remake combining two earlier Famicom games: Dragon Ball Z: Kyôshū! Saiyan and Dragon Ball Z II: Gekishin Frieza.



  • JP: August 7, 1992[14]
– Famicom
Notes:

Dragon Ball Z III: Ressen Jinzōningen (ドラゴンボールZIII 烈戦人造人間Doragon Bōru Zetto Surī Ressen Jinzōningen, Dragon Ball Z III: Hot Battle! Artificial Humans!) released on August 7, 1992 in Japan by Bandai for the Famicom. It is a retelling of the Android arc up until Cell transforms into his first form.



  • JP: December 29, 1992[14]
– Famicom
Notes:

Dragon Ball Z: Gekitō Tenkaichi Budokai (ドラゴンボールZ 激闘天下一武道会Doragon Bōru Zetto Gekitō Tenkaichi Budōkai) was released only in Japan by Bandai on December 29, 1992 for the Famicom. The game was unique in that it came with a special card reader attachment, the Datach Joint Rom System, which required several character cards to be swiped in order to select a character.



  • JP: March 20, 1993[14]
  • EU: November 30, 1993
– Super Famicom
Notes:

Dragon Ball Z: Super Butōden (ドラゴンボールZ 超武闘伝 (スーパーぶとうでん)Doragon Bōru Zetto Sūpā Butōden, Dragon Ball Z: Super Fighting Story) is the first installment in the Super Butōden series. The game was released in Japan on March 20, 1993 and in France and Spain on November 30, 1993. In Europe was often referred simply as Dragon Ball Z. Super Butōden features 13 playable characters (Goku, S.Goku, Gohan, Piccolo, Vegeta, S.Vegeta, Frieza, Cell, P.Cell, Trunks and the Androids #16, #18 and #20/Dr. Gero) and its story mode spans from the Piccolo Jr. arc to the conclusion of the Cell Games.



  • JP: August 6, 1993[14]
– Famicom
Notes:

Dragon Ball Z Gaiden: Saiyajin Zetsumetsu Keikaku (ドラゴンボールZ外伝 サイヤ人絶滅計画Doragon Bōru Zetto Gaiden Saiyajin Zetsumetsu Keikaku, Dragon Ball Z Side Story: Plan to Eradicate the Saiyans) was released for the Famicom on August 6, 1993.[19] Gameplay takes the form of a card battle RPG, where the player's movement and battle choices are dictated by the randomly generated playing cards the player receives. Multiplayer is a six player tournament using difficulty level of computer players that are in the save file. Players can choose between Goku, Gohan, Piccolo, Trunks and Vegeta. Winner records are kept in the game data, as well as any moves the player might learn.

The game follows, Dr. Lychee, a survivor of the Tuffle race annihilated by the Saiyans. Lychee manages to escape from the planet with a ship containing Hatchhyackku, a super computer able to create 'Ghost images' of other warriors, though he is killed soon after. Hatchhyackku creates a ghost image of him to get revenge on the surviving Saiyans. He places machines that emit a gas capable of destroying life on Earth, so Goku, Gohan, Vegeta, Future Trunks, and Piccolo rush to destroy the devices located around the planet. They manage to destroy all but one that is protected by an impenetrable energy barrier and guarded by ghost warriors of Frieza, Cooler, Turles, and Lord Slug, which have to be killed in the same way as the originals. They eventually track down Lychee, defeat him, and learn of Hatchhyackku, who absorbs Lychee's hatred and materializes in an android body. Hatchhyackku devastates the heroes until the Saiyans, after having transformed into their Super Saiyan states, combine their powers together into one massive wave of energy, ending the threat of the ghost warriors.


Dragon Ball Z: Super Butōden 2
Dragon Ball Z: La Légende Saien

  • JP: December 17, 1993[14]
  • EU: June 1994
  • NA: October 20, 2015[20]
– Super Famicom
Notes:

Dragon Ball Z: Super Butōden 2 (ドラゴンボールZ 超武闘伝 (スーパーぶとうでん)2Doragon Bōru Zetto Sūpā Butōden Tsū, Dragon Ball Z: Super Fighting Story 2), called Dragon Ball Z: la Légende Saien in France and in Spain (although it was translated as Dragon Ball Z: La Leyenda de Saien for the Spanish instruction manual), is the second installment in the Super Butōden series. The game was released in Japan on December 17, 1993 and in France and Spain in June 1994.[21][22]Super Butōden 2 features 10 playable characters (In the Japanese version are 8 normal, 2 unlockable with a code) and its story mode covers the Cell Games as well as several stories involving Bojack, Zangya, and Broly completely unrelated to the movies they hail from. For unknown reasons, these three characters were renamed Kujila, Aki, and Tara in the French version, respectively.

Depending on if the player wins or loses a battle, the story will take a different turn in the Story Mode, which leads to a lot of possibilities to experience.

This is the only Dragon Ball Z fighting game [23] in which Goku is not readily playable. A code is required in the Japanese version to unlock him and Broly, the other hidden character. This is not necessary in the European versions, as both characters are already unlocked.

This game was released in North America on the 3DS virtual console



– Mega Drive
Notes:

Dragon Ball Z: Buyū Retsuden (ドラゴンボールZ 武勇列伝Doragon Bōru Zetto Buyū Retsuden, Dragon Ball Z: Legend of Valiants), released as Dragon Ball Z: L'Appel du Destin (Dragon Ball Z: The Call of Destiny) in France and Spain and as Dragon Ball Z in Portugal, is a fighting game released for the Mega Drive. It was released in Japan on April 1, 1994[24] and Europe in June 1994.[25][26] The playable characters are Goku, Gohan, Krillin, Piccolo, Vegeta, Captain Ginyu, Recoome, Frieza, Future Trunks, Android 18, and Cell.


Dragon Ball Z: Shin Saiyajin Zenmetsu Keikaku — Chikyū-Hen

– Playdia
Notes:

Dragon Ball Z Gaiden: Saiyan Zetsumetsu Keikaku Chikyū-Hen (ドラゴンボールZ外伝 真サイヤ人絶滅計画 地球編Doragon Bōru Zetto Gaiden Shin Saiyajin Zetsumetsu Keikaku Chikyū-Hen, Dragon Ball Z Side Story: True Plan to Eradicate the Saiyans: Earth Edition) is part one in the Saiyan Zenmetsu Keikaku series for the Playdia. The game was released on September 23, 1994.[27]


Pentium e5400 drivers driver. Downloads for Intel® Pentium® Processor E5400 (2M Cache, 2.70 GHz, 800 MHz FSB).

Dragon Ball Z: Super Butōden 3
Dragon Ball Z: Ultime Menace

– Super Famicom
Notes:

Dragon Ball Z: Super Butōden 3 (ドラゴンボールZ 超武闘伝 (スーパーぶとうでん)3Doragon Bōru Zetto Sūpā Butōden Surī, Dragon Ball Z: Super Fighting Story 3), called Dragon Ball Z: Ultime Menace in France and in Spain (although it was translated as Dragon Ball Z: La Última Amenaza for the Spanish instruction manual), is the third installment in the Super Butōden series. The game was released in Japan on September 29, 1994 and in France and Spain on January 25, 1995.[28]Super Butōden 3 features ten playable characters (9 normal, 1 unlockable with a code). It is the only game in the series that lacks a story mode.


Dragon Ball Z: Idainaru Son Goku Densetsu

– PC Engine
Notes:

Dragon Ball Z: Idainaru Son Goku Densetsu (ドラゴンボールZ 偉大なる孫悟空伝説Doragon Bōru Zetto Idainaru Son Gokū Densetsu, Dragon Ball Z: The Greatest Son Goku Legend) was released for the PC Engine (the Japanese version of the TurboGrafx-16) on November 11, 1994. It features Gohan telling Goten of the battles of their deceased father, Goku, along with other characters. The game illustrates Goku's seven greatest battles: Fighting Tao Pai Pai, challenging Tienshinhan at the Tenkaichi Budokai, destroying King Piccolo, fighting Piccolo at the Tenkaichi Budokai, protecting Earth from Vegeta, saving Namek from Frieza, and sacrificing his life to save the world from Perfect Cell.


Dragon Ball Z Gaiden: Saiyajin Zetsumetsu Keikaku~Uchū-Hen

– Playdia
Notes:

Dragon Ball Z Gaiden: Saiyan Zetsumetsu Keikaku~Uchū-Hen (ドラゴンボールZ外伝 真サイヤ人絶滅計画 宇宙編Doragon Bōru Zetto Gaiden Shin Saiyajin Zetsumetsu Keikaku Uchū-Hen, Dragon Ball Z Side Story: True Plan to Eradicate the Saiyans: Universe Edition) is part two in the Saiyan Zetsumetsu Keikaku series. The game was released on December 16, 1994.[29]



  • JP: March 24, 1995[14]
– Super Famicom
Notes:

Dragon Ball Z: Super Goku Den — Totsugeki-Hen (ドラゴンボールZ 超悟空伝 突激編Doragon Bōru Z Sūpā Gokū-den Totsugeki-hen) was released on March 24, 1995.[30]Totsugeki-Hen chronicles the adventures of Goku and his adventures through the start of Dragon Ball all the way to the final battle with Piccolo Daimao.



  • JP: July 28, 1995[14]
  • EU: June 1996
  • NA: March 25, 2003
– PlayStation
Notes:

Dragon Ball Z: Ultimate Battle 22 (ドラゴンボールZ アルティメイトバトル22Doragon Bōru Zetto Arutimeito Batoru Towintetzū) is a fighting game released July 28, 1995 in Japan (re-released as PlayStation the Best for Family on December 6, 1996), released in Europe on June 1996,[31] and released in North America years later on March 25, 2003. The game features cel drawings from the animators as character sprites and three dimensional backgrounds. The playable characters are Goku, Gohan, Vegeta, Future Trunks, Cell, Android 16, Android 18, Frieza, Zarbon, Recoome, Captain Ginyu, Dabura, Goten, Kid Trunks, Supreme Kai, Fat Buu, Super Buu, Super Saiyan Gotenks, Great Saiyaman, Krillin, Tien, and Piccolo. Unlockable characters include Gogeta, Mr. Satan, Master Roshi, Super Saiyan 3 Goku, and Kid Goku.

Ultimate Battle 22 was the subject of an overwhelming number of negative American reviews. GameSpot give it a 1.2/10, calling it a 'really, really terrible game.' X-Play said it was 'a waste of time and money.' Official PlayStation Magazine gave it a 1/5, the second lowest score possible. Electronic Gaming Monthly said that 'someone crapped in a jewel case and passed it off as a game.' Overall, it has a 32% on GameRankings.



  • JP: September 22, 1995[14]
– Super Famicom
Notes:

Dragon Ball Z: Super Goku Den — Kakusei-Hen (ドラゴンボールZ 超悟空伝 覚醒編Doragon Bōru Z Sūpā Gokū-den Kakusei-hen) is the second game in the Super Gokuden series. The game was released on September 22, 1995.[32]Kakusei-Hen follows the story of Goku from his fight with Piccolo at the 23rd World Tournament to his final battle with Frieza after the latter had reached the Super Saiyan state.



  • JP: November 17, 1995[14]
– Sega Saturn
Notes:

Dragon Ball Z: Shin Super Butōden (ドラゴンボールZ 真武闘伝Doragon Bōru Zetto Shin Butōden, Dragon Ball Z: True Fighting Story) is the fourth installment in the Super Butōden series. The game was released only in Japan on November 17, 1995. The game features 27 playable characters, their sprites being those used in an earlier Dragon Ball Z game, Dragon Ball Z: Ultimate Battle 22. Its story mode ranges from the Android arc to the Cell Games.

Shin Butōden also features two other exclusive modes: Group Battle and Mr. Satan mode. In Group Battle, players gets to create a team of five characters and fight against either another player or an AI-controlled character. In Mr. Satan mode, Mr. Satan is trying to raise enough money to pay off his debt to Android 18, and the player places bets on matches and cheats by using several items, such as banana peels, guns, and dynamite.



  • JP: March 29, 1996[14]
  • EU: February 1997
– Super Famicom
Notes:

Dragon Ball Z: Hyper Dimension (ドラゴンボールZ ハイパー ディメンションDoragon Bōru Zetto Haipā Dimenshon) is the last Dragon Ball Z fighting game released for the Super Famicom/SNES in Japan and Europe. It was released in Japan on March 29, 1996 and in France and Spain on February 1997.[33] The Japanese version of the game features a story mode that begins from the Frieza arc and ends at the end of the series. The amount of life for characters is measured by a number system from 1 to 999, which can be charged at any time during the match. When the life reaches a level below 80, the characters are able to perform 'desperate moves', which cause a large amount of damage. The characters fight on a multi-tier stage, which allows opponents to hit each other to other stages. The playable characters are Goku, Vegeta, Gohan, Perfect Cell, Piccolo, Vegito, Frieza, Fat Buu, Kid Buu, and Gotenks.



– PlayStation, Sega Saturn
Notes:

Dragon Ball Z: Idainaru Dragon Ball Densetsu (ドラゴンボールZ 偉大なるドラゴンボール伝説Doragon Bōru Zetto Idainaru Doragon Bōru Densetsu, Dragon Ball Z: The Greatest Dragon Ball Legend) is a fighting game produced and released by Bandai on May 31, 1996 in Japan, released for the Sega Saturn and PlayStation. Greatest Hits versions were released on June 20, 1997 for the Saturn and June 27, 1997 for the PlayStation.[14] In Europe, only the Sega Saturn version was released in France and Spain on December 1996,[34] with the French edition retaining the original Japanese name (although is translated as Dragon Ball Z: La grande légende des boules de cristal in the title screen) and the Spanish edition being re-addressed as Dragon Ball Z: The Legend.The game utilizes a unique system of play that is different from most other fighters and the graphics feature 2-D sprites in a three dimensional world.



  • JP: August 21, 1997[14]
  • EU: November 2, 1997
  • NA: July 31, 1997
  • JP: July 23, 1998(Greatest Hits)
  • NA: August 24, 2004(Reprint)
  • EU: October 4, 2002(Reprint)
– PlayStation
Notes:

Dragon Ball GT: Final Bout, known in Japan and Europe as Dragon Ball: Final Bout (ドラゴンボール ファイナルバウト, Doragon Bōru Fainaru Bauto?), is a fighting game for the PlayStation. It was produced and released by Bandai in Japan, parts of Europe, and North America in 1997. The game would reissued in Europe in 2002 and in North America in 2004. The game shares the distinction of being the first game in the series to be rendered in full 3D, and the last Dragon Ball game produced for the console. There would not be another new Dragon Ball game for consoles until the release of Dragon Ball Z: Budokai in 2002.

The game is similar to other fighters but features 3D environments and characters from the Z and GT series of Dragon Ball franchise. Unique in the game were the special ki attacks called a Special Knockout Trick. These were the spectacular versions of the character's ki attacks the player performed at a distance. When these attacks are performed, the camera would cut and pan to the attacking character who would power up and the player would fire. During the attacking character's power up, the opposing character would be giving the opportunity to either retaliate or block upon the moment the word counter would flash on the lower right hand corner of the screen. If the player chose to retaliate, they too would power up and fire a ki attack causing a power crossfire which the camera would go around both characters à la bullet time. Depending on which player is pressing their button the fastest would determine who would receive the brunt of the blast. Another feature which was carried over from Legends, was a technique called Meteor Smash. With a key combo, players could ignite a chain of mêlée attacks.


2000s[edit]

TitleDetails

  • AU: 2001
– Microsoft Windows / Macintosh
Notes:

A series of 10 collectible pocket CD-ROMs released in 2001 exclusively in Australia and designed and produced by Streamedia Pty Ltd. Each CD-ROM featured a different character and contained information on the respective character and the Dragon Ball Z sagas, merchandise available to acquire and a 'BattlePrint' activity mode. Each disc was available at random from packets and also given as part of a promotion with Coca-Cola products.[35]

Dragon Games For Ps4


TitleDetails

Original release date(s):
PlayStation 2
  • EU: November 2, 2002
  • NA: December 3, 2002
  • JP: February 13, 2003[14]
Release years by system:
2002 - PlayStation 2
2003 - GameCube
2012 - PlayStation 3
2012 - Xbox 360



Original release date(s):
PlayStation 2
  • EU: November 14, 2003
  • AU: November 23, 2003
  • NA: December 4, 2003
  • JP: February 5, 2004[14]
Release years by system:
2003 - PlayStation 2
2004 - GameCube



Original release date(s):
  • NA: November 16, 2004
  • EU: November 19, 2004
  • AU: November 26, 2004
  • JP: February 10, 2005[14]
Release years by system:
2004 - PlayStation 2
2012 - PlayStation 3
2012 - Xbox 360



Original release date(s):
  • NA: March 22, 2005
Release years by system:
2005- GameCube, PlayStation 2, Xbox
Notes:

The first Dragon Ball Z console game to be developed by a non-Japanese developer (American in this case), and the first Dragon Ball Z game to be released on a non-Japanese console: the Xbox.



Original release date(s):
  • JP: October 6, 2005[14]
  • NA: October 18, 2005
  • EU: October 21, 2005
Release years by system:
2005 - PlayStation 2



Original release date(s):
Arcade
  • JP: December 22, 2005

PlayStation 2

  • JP: June 29, 2006[14]
  • NA: July 18, 2006
  • PAL: July 28, 2006
Release years by system:
2005 - Arcade
2006 - PlayStation 2



Original release date(s):
PlayStation 2
  • JP: October 5, 2006[14]
  • EU: November 3, 2006
  • NA: November 7, 2006
Release years by system:
2006 - PlayStation 2
2006 - Wii



Original release date(s):
PlayStation 2
  • JP: October 4, 2007[14]
  • EU: November 9, 2007
  • NA: November 13, 2007
Release years by system:
2007 - PlayStation 2
2007 - Wii



Original release date(s):
  • JP: June 5, 2008[14]
  • EU: June 6, 2008
  • NA: June 10, 2008
  • AU: July 3, 2008
Release years by system:
2008 - PlayStation 3, Xbox 360



Original release date(s):
  • JP: December 4, 2008[14]
  • NA: December 4, 2008
  • EU: December 5, 2008
Release years by system:
2008 - PlayStation 2



Original release date(s):
  • JP: July 23, 2009[14]
  • AU: October 15, 2009
  • NA: October 20, 2009
  • EU: October 30, 2009
Release years by system:
2009 - Wii
Notes:

Released in Japan as Dragon Ball: World's Greatest Adventure (ドラゴンボール天下一大冒険Doragon Bōru Tenka-ichi Dai-Bōken)[36]



Original release date(s):
  • JP: November 12, 2009[14]
  • NA: November 10, 2009
  • EU: November 13, 2009
  • AU: November 19, 2009
Release years by system:
2009 - PlayStation 3, Xbox 360


2010s[edit]

TitleDetails

Original release date(s):
  • JP: November 11, 2010[14]
  • EU: November 5, 2010
  • NA: November 2, 2010
Release years by system:
2010 - PlayStation 3, Xbox 360



2010 – Microsoft Windows
Notes:

First MMORPG based in the Dragon Ball universe.



Original release date(s):
  • NA: October 25, 2011
  • EU: October 28, 2011
  • JP: December 8, 2011[14]
Release years by system:
2011 - PlayStation 3, Xbox 360



Original release date(s):
  • NA: October 9, 2012
  • EU: October 5, 2012
Release years by system:
2012 - Xbox 360



Original release date(s):
  • NA: November 6, 2012
  • EU: November 2, 2012
Release years by system:
2012 - PlayStation 3, Xbox 360



Original release date(s):
  • JP: January 23, 2014[14]
  • EU: January 24, 2014
  • NA: January 28, 2014
Release years by system:
2014 - PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, PlayStation Vita



Original release date(s):
  • JP: February 5, 2015[14]
  • EU: February 27, 2015
  • NA: February 24, 2015
Release years by system:
2015 - PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, Xbox 360, Xbox One, Microsoft Windows



Original release date(s):
  • JP: November 2, 2016[14]
  • EU: October 28, 2016
  • NA: October 25, 2016
Release years by system:
2016 - PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Microsoft Windows
2017 - Nintendo Switch



Original release date(s):
  • WW: January 26, 2018
  • JP: February 1, 2018[14]
Release years by system:
2018 - PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch, Microsoft Windows



Original release date(s):
  • WW: April 5, 2019
Release years by system:
2019 - Nintendo Switch, Microsoft Windows


2020s[edit]

TitleDetails

Original release date(s):
  • JP: January 16, 2020
  • WW: January 17, 2020
Release years by system:
2020 - Xbox One, Microsoft Windows, PlayStation 4
Notes:

It will be an action role-playing game.


Dragon ball z games ps4 list

Handheld console games[edit]

TitleDetails

  • JP: November 25, 1994[14]
– Game Boy
Notes:

Dragon Ball Z: Goku Hishōden (ドラゴンボールZ: 悟空飛翔伝Doragon Bōru Zetto: Gokū Hishōden) is the first installment in the Goku RPG series, released on November 25, 1994. Despite the title, the game starts out during the end of Goku's fight with Piccolo at the World Martial Arts Tournament and ends with the battle against Vegeta.



  • JP: August 25, 1995[14]
– Game Boy
Notes:

Dragon Ball Z: Goku Gekitōden (ドラゴンボールZ: 悟空激闘伝Doragon Bōru Zetto: Gokū Gekitōden) is the second installment in the Goku RPG series, released on August 25, 1995. It features five playable characters, as well as Goku's Super Saiyan transformation. Goku Gekitōden takes place immediately after Son Goku's battle with Vegeta, and ends with Son Goku's final battle with Freeza.

In Goku Gekitōden, moving about and fighting is real time, unlike its predecessor. The game also features many extras, such as minigames and a tournament mode. Most characters from the Namek arc can be fought during the story mode, including ones such as Zarbon and Freeza's transformed states.



  • NA: May 14, 2002
  • EU: October 4, 2002
– Game Boy Advance



  • NA: May 29, 2002
– Game Boy Advance
Notes:

Dragon Ball Z Collectible Card Game was released on May 29, 2002 by Atari. It is based on the Dragon Ball Z Collectible Card Game.



  • JP: August 9, 2002[14]
  • EU: June 30, 2002
  • NA: November 8, 2002
– Game Boy Color
Notes:

Dragon Ball Z: Legendary Super Warriors (ドラゴンボールZ 伝説の超戦士たちDoragon Bōru Zetto Densetsu no Chō Senshi Tachi) is a turn-based strategy game developed and released for the Game Boy Color by Banpresto. It was released in Europe on June 30, 2002, Japan on August 9, 2002, and North America on November 2002. It is played with the use of in-game cards for attacks, techniques and support items. The game's story takes place from the Saiyan arc, and runs until the end of the series. The game also includes two extra stories involving Future Trunks's timeline. The game boasts a large array of characters and forms for the various characters. The first playthrough selects one or two characters for each battle, and subsequent playthroughs allow the player to select various unlockable characters for any scenario.



  • NA: June 17, 2003
  • EU: August 1, 2003
  • JP: July 23, 2004[14]
– Game Boy Advance



  • JP: November 20, 2003[14]
– WonderSwan Color
Notes:

Remake of the third Dragon Ball game for the Family Computer.



  • NA: November 24, 2003
– Game Boy Advance



  • JP: March 26, 2004[14]
  • NA: June 22, 2004
  • EU: August 27, 2004
– Game Boy Advance



  • NA: September 14, 2004
– Game Boy Advance



  • JP: November 18, 2004[14]
  • EU: June 17, 2005
  • NA: June 6, 2006
– Game Boy Advance



  • NA: August 9, 2005
– Game Boy Advance



  • JP: December 1, 2005[14]
  • NA: November 20, 2005
  • EU: February 3, 2006
  • AU: December 8, 2005
– Nintendo DS



  • JP: April 20, 2006[14]
  • NA: March 7, 2006
  • EU: May 25, 2006
– PlayStation Portable



  • JP: March 21, 2007[14]
  • NA: June 5, 2007
  • EU: August 31, 2007
  • AU: 2007
– Nintendo DS



  • JP: June 7, 2007[14]
  • NA: March 20, 2007
  • EU: June 22, 2007
  • AU: June 29, 2007
– PlayStation Portable



  • JP: September 18, 2008[14]
  • NA: November 4, 2008
  • EU: December 5, 2008
  • AU: December 4, 2008
  • KOR: December 11, 2008
– Nintendo DS



  • JP: March 19, 2009[14]
  • NA: April 8, 2009
  • EU: April 17, 2009
– PlayStation Portable



  • JP: April 29, 2009[14]
  • EU: November 6, 2009
  • NA: November 10, 2009
  • AU: November 5, 2009
– Nintendo DS



  • JP: February 11, 2010[14]
  • NA: June 22, 2010
  • EU: July 2, 2010
– Nintendo DS



  • JP: September 30, 2010[14]
  • NA: October 19, 2010
  • EU: October 22, 2010
  • AU: October 21, 2010
– PlayStation Portable



  • JP: February 4, 2011[14]
– Nintendo DS



  • JP: February 28, 2013[14]
– Nintendo 3DS



  • JP: August 7, 2014[14]
– Nintendo 3DS



  • JP: June 11, 2015[14]
  • NA: October 20, 2015
  • EU: October 16, 2015
  • AU: October 16, 2015
– Nintendo 3DS
Notes:

For those who pre-ordered the game this game through Amazon would receive an email with a code to download the Japanese version of Dragon Ball Z: Super Butoden 2 They would also receive 6 extra Z Assist support characters via an additional code sent a few days following the games release. This extra content was also available through pre-ordering the game digitally via the Nintendo eShop or through purchasing the Dragon Ball Z: Extreme Butōden New 3DS bundle.



  • JP: August 4, 2016[14]
  • NA: November 22, 2016
  • EU: February 17, 2017
  • AU: February 17, 2017
– Nintendo 3DS



  • JP: April 27, 2017[14]
– Nintendo 3DS


Arcade games[edit]

TitleDetails

Original release date(s):
1987
Release years by system:


Dragon Ball Z

Original release date(s):
1993
Release years by system:
Notes:

Dragon Ball Z (ドラゴンボールZDoragon Bōru Zetto) is a fighting game designed and manufactured in Japan by Banpresto in 1993.[37] The game's cabinet is shaped like a robot with markings similar to Goku's gi. The game features large sprites and a color palete that is identical Toriyama's water color scheme in the manga. The environments are semi destructible as chunks of wall or ground could be destroyed. The controls are unique as most of the characters movements are flight related. The playable characters are Goku, Super Saiyan Goku, Gohan, Vegeta, Piccolo, Frieza, Captain Ginyu, Recoome, and Burter.



1994 – Arcade
Notes:

Dragon Ball Z 2: Super Battle[38] (ドラゴンボールZ 2 スパーバトルDoragon Bōru Zetto Tsū Supā Batoru) the sequel to Dragon Ball Z released in 1994, also produced by Banpresto. The gameplay matches the Butōden series of games rather than the previous arcade game. The characters are Goku, Gohan, Vegeta, Future Trunks, Piccolo, Cell, Android 16, Android 18, Android 20, and Mr. Satan.


Dragon Ball Z: V.R.V.S.

Original release date(s):
1994
Release years by system:
Notes:

Dragon Ball Z: V.R.V.S. is a fighting game released in 1994 for the Sega System 32 arcade platform by Sega and Banpresto. Although the game is in 2D, it uses camera angles positioned behind the characters to create a 3D-like experience. The game is controlled with a joysick and 3 buttons; a deluxe edition of the game features motion sensors that allow the player to move his or her body to control the character in the game. The object of the game is to defeat six opponents. The playable characters are Goku, Gohan, Piccolo, Vegeta, and Future Trunks. The final boss is an original character named Ozotto.

A port of the game for the 3DO was in development titled Dragon Ball Z: Cell To Kogeki Da and would feature Cell instead of Ozotto. The game was playable at a Japanese convention however it was never released.[39]



Original release date(s):
December 22, 2005
Release years by system:
Notes:

Same game that was later ported to the PlayStation 2.


Data Carddass Dragon Ball Z

Original release date(s):
Release years by system:



Original release date(s):
April 2006
Release years by system:


Dragon Ball Z: Bakuretsu Impact

Original release date(s):
March 16, 2007
Release years by system:
Notes:

Dragon Ball Z: Bakuretsu Impact (ドラゴンボールZ 爆烈インパクトDoragon Bōru Zetto Bakuretsu Inpakuto, Dragon Ball Z: Burst Impact) is the third card-based fighting game for Bandai's Data Carddass arcade system. It was developed by Dimps and released on March 16, 2007 in Japan only by Bandai.



Original release date(s):
May 14, 2008
Release years by system:
Notes:

Dragon Ball Z: W Bakuretsu Impact (ドラゴンボールZ W爆烈インパクトDoragon Bōru Zetto Daburu Bakuretsu Inpakuto, Dragon Ball Z: W Burst Impact) is the fourth card-based fighting game released on Bandai's Data Carddass arcade system.The playable characters are Goku, Gohan, Vegeta, Piccolo, Kid Goku, Pan, Future Trunks, Goten, Gotenks, Arale Norimaki, Majin Buu, Super Buu, Kid Buu, Broly, Super 17, Nova Shenron, Omega Shenron, and Mighty Mask.


Dragon Ball Z: Dragon Battlers

Original release date(s):
April 21, 2009
Release years by system:



Original release date(s):
November 11, 2010
Release years by system:


Dragon Ball: Zenkai Battle Royale

Original release date(s):
February 4, 2011
Release years by system:
Notes:

First arcade game that uses GGPO middleware for network/internet play.


Mobile games[edit]

TitleDetails

  • JP: January 2007
– LCD game
Notes:

Dragon Radar Mobile (ドラゴンレーダーモバイルDoragon Rēdā Mobairu) is a handheld LCD game that is produced by Bandai exclusively in Japan on January 2007. The game is featured in the shape of the dragon radar from the series and comes in either the standard white or orange colors which are listed as 'Dragon Radar Mobile: White' and 'Dragon Radar Mobile: Orange'. The game features two distinct modes of play, a battle game and a search game. The game controls are determined by the player's hand movement by a motion device, and features a 'accelerometer' that determines the strength of the players attacks by how hard the player shakes the device. Players can also compete with other players courtesy of an infrared sensor which can detect other radars for two player mode.



  • JP: October 15, 2007
– Mobile
Notes:

It is part of Dragon Ball Mobile series.



  • JP: October 15, 2007
– Mobile
Notes:

It is part of Dragon Ball Mobile series.



  • JP: October 15, 2007
– Mobile
Notes:

It is part of Dragon Ball Mobile series.



  • JP: October 15, 2007
– Mobile
Notes:

It is part of Dragon Ball Mobile series.



  • JP: October 15, 2007
– Mobile
Notes:

It is part of Dragon Ball Mobile series.



  • JP: April 14, 2008
– Mobile
Notes:

A Dragon Ball-themed for Sugoroku Mobile Game.



  • JP: August 5, 2008
– Mobile



  • JP: January 22, 2009
– Mobile



  • JP: March 26, 2013[14]
– Mobile



Original release date(s):
  • JP: January 30, 2015
  • WW: July 16, 2015
Release years by system:
2015 - Android, iOS



Original release date(s):
  • NA: May 18, 2018
  • WW: May 28, 2018
Release years by system:
2018 - Android, iOS


Commercial reception[edit]

Dragon Ball video game retail sales in Japan (1986–2016)
Platform(s)TitleReleaseJapan retail salesJapan sales revenue (est.)Ref
FamicomDragon Ball: Shenlong no NazoNovember 27, 19861,250,000¥6,625,000,000[40][41]
Dragon Ball: Daimaō FukkatsuAugust 12, 1988530,000¥3,074,000,000[41]
Dragon Ball 3: Goku DenOctober 27, 1989760,000¥5,168,000,000
Dragon Ball Z: Kyôshū! SaiyanOctober 27, 1990900,000¥7,020,000,000
Dragon Ball Z II: Gekishin FriezaAugust 10, 1991790,000¥6,478,000,000
Super FamicomDragon Ball Z: Super Saiya DensetsuJanuary 25, 1992730,000¥6,935,000,000[41]
FamicomDragon Ball Z III: Ressen JinzōningenAugust 7, 1992610,000¥4,758,000,000
Dragon Ball Z: Gekitō Tenkaichi BudokaiDecember 29, 1992330,000¥2,418,000,000
Super FamicomDragon Ball Z: Super ButōdenMarch 20, 19931,450,000¥15,346,800,000[40][42]
FamicomDragon Ball Z Gaiden: Saiyajin Zetsumetsu KeikakuAugust 6, 1993300,000¥10,998,000,000[41]
Super FamicomDragon Ball Z: Super Butōden 2December 17, 19931,200,000¥12,700,800,000[40][42]
Dragon Ball Z: Super Butōden 3September 29, 1994910,000¥8,918,000,000[41]
PC Engine Super CD-ROM²Dragon Ball Z: Idainaru Son Goku DensetsuNovember 11, 199440,000¥352,000,000[41]
Game BoyDragon Ball Z: Goku HishōdenNovember 25, 1994240,000¥1,118,400,000
Super FamicomDragon Ball Z: Super Goku Den — Totsugeki-HenMarch 24, 1995420,000¥4,536,000,000
PlayStationDragon Ball Z: Ultimate Battle 22July 28, 1995320,000¥2,560,000,000
Game BoyDragon Ball Z: Goku GekitōdenAugust 25, 199590,000¥506,790,000
Super FamicomDragon Ball Z: Super Goku Den — Kakusei-HenSeptember 22, 1995130,000¥506,790,000
Sega SaturnDragon Ball Z: Shin ButōdenNovember 17, 1995110,000¥748,000,000
Super FamicomDragon Ball Z: Hyper DimensionMarch 29, 1996220,000¥1,716,000,000
PlayStation / Sega SaturnDragon Ball Z: Idainaru Dragon Ball DensetsuMay 31, 1996320,000¥1,856,000,000
PlayStationDragon Ball GT: Final BoutAugust 21, 1997245,000¥1,421,000,000
Game Boy ColorDragon Ball Z: Legendary Super WarriorsAugust 9, 200268,049¥1,190,700,000[40][43]
PlayStation 2Dragon Ball ZFebruary 13, 2003570,000¥1,666,000,000[41]
GameCubeNovember 28, 200378,000¥530,400,000
WonderSwan ColorDragon BallNovember 20, 20039,000¥35,820,000
PlayStation 2Dragon Ball Z 2February 5, 2004584,183¥4,290,239,952[40][44]
Game Boy AdvanceDragon Ball Z: Supersonic WarriorsMarch 26, 2004182,766¥877,276,800[45]
Dragon Ball Z: The Legacy of Goku II InternationalJuly 23, 200467,000¥321,600,000[41]
Dragon Ball: Advanced AdventureNovember 18, 2004152,000¥729,600,000
PlayStation 2Dragon Ball Z 3February 10, 2005696,230¥6,560,151,500[46][47]
Dragon Ball Z: Sparking!October 6, 2005610,000¥4,148,000,000[41]
Nintendo DSDragon Ball Z: Supersonic Warriors 2December 1, 2005380,000¥1,824,000,000[41]
PlayStation PortableDragon Ball Z: Shin BudokaiApril 20, 2006170,000¥816,000,000
PlayStation 2Super Dragon Ball ZJune 29, 2006220,000¥1,496,000,000
Dragon Ball Z: Sparking! NeoOctober 5, 2006650,000¥4,420,000,000
Nintendo DSDragon Ball Z: Harukanaru DensetsuMarch 21, 2007170,000¥816,000,000
PlayStation PortableDragon Ball Z: Shin Budokai 2June 7, 2007140,000¥672,000,000
PlayStation 2Dragon Ball Z: Sparking! MeteorOctober 4, 2007500,000¥3,400,000,000
Nintendo DSDragon Ball: OriginsSeptember 18, 2008240,000¥1,152,000,000
PlayStation 2Dragon Ball Z: Infinite WorldDecember 4, 2008200,000¥1,160,000,000
PlayStation PortableDragonball EvolutionMarch 19, 200913,000¥62,400,000
Nintendo DSDragon Ball Z: Attack of the SaiyansApril 29, 2009207,000¥993,600,000
Dragon Ball: Origins 2February 11, 201078,000¥388,440,000
PlayStation PortableDragon Ball Z: Tenkaichi Tag TeamSeptember 30, 201085,000¥423,300,000
Nintendo DSDragon Ball Kai: Ultimate ButodenFebruary 4, 2011108,000¥518,400,000
PlayStation 3Dragon Ball Z: Burst LimitJune 5, 2008180,000¥1,337,040,000
WiiDragon Ball: Revenge of King PiccoloJuly 23, 200980,000¥544,000,000
PlayStation 3Dragon Ball: Raging BlastNovember 12, 2009145,000¥1,012,100,000
WiiDragon Ball Z: Budokai Tenkaichi 3 (Wii Select)February 25, 2010106,407¥297,939,600[48]
PlayStation 3Dragon Ball: Raging Blast 2November 11, 201097,000¥677,060,000[41]
Dragon Ball Z: Ultimate TenkaichiDecember 8, 201184,000¥586,320,000
Nintendo 3DSDragon Ball Heroes: Ultimate MissionFebruary 28, 2013308,000¥1,701,084,000
PlayStation 3Dragon Ball Z: Battle of ZJanuary 23, 2014136,000¥968,728,000
PlayStation Vita60,060¥370,690,320[49]
Nintendo 3DSDragon Ball Heroes: Ultimate Mission 2August 7, 2014336,087¥1,912,335,030[45]
PlayStation 3Dragon Ball XenoverseFebruary 5, 2015228,000¥1,623,360,000[41]
Nintendo 3DSDragon Ball Z: Extreme ButōdenJune 11, 2015180,000¥1,024,200,000
Dragon Ball FusionsAugust 4, 2016237,320¥1,352,724,000[45]
1986–201620,144,695¥157,660,089,202 ($1.941 billion)
Bandai and Bandai Namco revenue from Dragon Ball video games (1986–2019)
Fiscal periodRevenueRef
November 1986 to March 2007(Japan only)¥135,482,368,252[a]
April 2007 to March 2008(excluding United States)¥12,300,000,000[50]
April 2008 to March 2009¥12,100,000,000
April 2009 to March 2010¥9,200,000,000[51]
April 2010 to March 2011¥5,600,000,000
April 2011 to March 2012¥7,400,000,000
April 2012 to December 2012¥3,500,000,000[52]
January 2013 to March 2013¥600,000,000[53]
April 2013 to December 2013¥2,400,000,000[54]
January 2014 to March 2014¥2,600,000,000[53]
April 2014 to December 2014¥4,100,000,000[55]
January 2015 to March 2015¥9,500,000,000[56]
April 2015 to March 2016¥23,300,000,000[57]
April 2016 to December 2016¥32,200,000,000[58]
January 2017 to March 2017¥18,600,000,000[59]
April 2017 to March 2018¥83,700,000,000[60]
April 2018 to March 2019¥108,600,000,000[61]
November 1986 to March 2019¥437,882,368,252 ($4.927 billion)
Atari revenue from Dragon Ball game sales in the United States (2003–2008)
Fiscal periodUnited States sales revenueRef
May 2002 to March 2003$115,823,000[b]
April 2003 to March 2004$85,000,000[65]
April 2004 to March 2005$85,900,000
April 2005 to March 2006$59,144,800[66]
April 2006 to March 2007$55,891,100
April 2007 to March 2008$39,344,321
April 2003 to March 2008$441,103,221

Notes[edit]

  1. ^See Dragon Ball video game retail sales in Japan (1986–2016) table above
  2. ^Atari's Dragon Ball video game sales revenue in the United States between May 2002 and March 2003:
    • Dragon Ball Z: The Legacy of Goku (2002) on GBA – 1.4million units,[62] average $29.17 price[63]$40,838,000
    • Dragon Ball Z: Budokai (2002) on PS2 – 1.5million units,[62] $49.99 price[64]$74,985,000

References[edit]

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External links[edit]

  • Official Bandai Namco website(in Japanese)
Retrieved from 'https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_Dragon_Ball_video_games&oldid=919885525'
Dragon Ball Z: Budokai Tenkaichi 3 is a Fighting, Single and Multiplayer video game developed by Spike Chunsoft and published by Atari. The game is based on the anime and manage Dragon Ball series and offers all characters. Each character has its own abilities, attacks and fighting behaviour… read more

12 Dragon Ball Z: Budokai Tenkaichi 3 Alternatives & Similar Games for PS4

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1. Injustice: Gods Among Us

Injustice: Gods Among Us mixes different elements such as Action, Fighting, Superheroes, 2D, and Beat ‘em up. The game supports both Single and Multiplayer modes and includes different superheroes such as Joker, Batman, and more. It revolves around combo-based combat. It offers the similar gameplay like Mortal Combat and introduces narrative-driven, online functionality and campaign. It offers an immersive story, in which the game takes place in the Universe of Justice League where the Superman creates a new world after beating the Joker and destroying Metropolis. There are a massive variety of characters, and the game lets the player choose his character and fight against his opponent in a one-on-one fighting match. To progress through the game, the player has to defeat his all opponents in different stages and complete the match to show off his fighting abilities. According to the story, Joker destroys Metropolis using a nuclear weapon and try to kill millions of people, Superman, and his unborn child. After that, the Batman try to investigate the antagonist named Joker on where he kept the weapon. With the well-written story, addictive gameplay, and superb mechanics, Injustice: Gods Among Us is the best game to play and enjoy.

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2. Street Fighter V

Street Fighter V is an Action, Fighting, Single and Multiplayer video game developed and published by Capcom. It is the sixth main installment in the series of Street Fighter. The game offers the similar gameplay like its previous entries and focuses on side-scroll gameplay combat system. It introduces new features called V-Gauge which enhances as you receives attacks and include three new abilities and skills. There are sixteen characters, and you can choose one of them to get into the game world where you have to fight against rival opponents and take down them using your combo skills. The game includes a variety of stages, and each stage offers two levels. The game takes place in different locations and provides a different location in each stage. It revolves around the character named Charlie Nash who awakens in a mysterious tomb after defeating by M. Bison. A woman called Helen instructed him to retrieve an artifact from the former friend named Guile that will assist him to take down Bison. Progress through the game, and complete all stages of the match to prove your skills and fighting abilities. With enhanced mechanics, addictive gameplay, and superb visuals, Street Fighter V is the best game to play and enjoy.

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Dragon

3. Mortal Kombat X

Mortal Kombat X is an Action, Violent, Side-Scroll Fighting, Single and Multiplayer video game created by NetherRealm Studios and published by Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment. It is the tenth main entry in the long-running series of Mortal Kombat. It takes place in the fictional world and includes a series of characters each with unique skills, fighting style, and abilities. To dive into the game world, you have to pick your character and start playing against Artificial Intelligence in Single-player or other players in Multiplayer mode. It offers the similar gameplay like its previous entries and introduces new characters, stages, and items. The game revolves around one-on-one combat system and lets you defeat your opponents using a variety of special moves, including attacks and finishing moves. You can interact with an environment similar to Injustice: Gods Among Us and can use a variety of weapons to take down the foe. Mortal Kombat X offers cool features, stunning environment, superb mechanics, and brilliant visuals. Mortal Kombat X is the best game to play and enjoy.

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4. Dead or Alive 5: Last Round

Dead or Alive 5: Last Round combines the elements of Action, and Fighting created by Team Ninja and published by Koei Tecmo. It supports both Single and Multiplayer modes and it is the third main entry in the series of Dead or Alive 5. There are a variety of characters such as Akira Yuki, Brad Wong, Ein, Eliot, Bayman, Bass Armstrong, etc. and you are able to choose one of them to dive into the game world where you have to complete all matches by defeating your opponents. The game revolves around one-on-one fighting combat. Over 10 stages offers different environment and each character has its unique skills, items and fighting style. The ultimate task is to avoid opponent attack using block element and try to attack him using combo-based system and decrease his health bar to take down. With addictive gameplay, superb mechanics, customizable controls, and lots of exciting characters and Dead or Alive 5: Last Round is the best game to play and amuse. Try it out and you’ll enjoy it.

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5. Ultra Street Fighter 4

Ultra Street Fighter 4 is an Action, Fighting, Arcade, Single and Multiplayer video game developed and published by Capcom. It the marvelous entry in the series of Street Fighter games and includes a new stages, characters and items. It focuses on combo-based combat system and revolves around one-on-one fighting match. There are a variety of superb characters and the game lets the player select one of them to dive into the game world where he has to fight against Computer controlled characters in Single-player or another player in Multiplayer player. It introduces defend system and lets you avoid attack using it and try to decrease against player health bar to take down or avoid his attack to prevent death. Different stages has different environment that the player must enjoy. It offers the similar gameplay like its previous editions and offers key features, enhanced mechanics, gameplay, characters’ abilities, and more. Try it out and you’ll love it.

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6. War of the Monsters

War of the Monsters is an Action Fighting, Single and Multiplayer video game created by Incognito Entertainment and published by Sony Computer Entertainment. The game takes place in the planet Earth aftermath of an alien invasion, in which giant monsters are battling against each other in city environment. It uses third-person perspective and includes a variety of monsters. Your primary goal is to select your character, environment, and mode to start battle with a task to take down your opponent before time runs out. You can engage yourself in one-on-one battle experience. Each monster offers its unique skills and abilities and you must try to damage the health bar of your competitor to defeat them. Avoid their attack and continue your progress. Use acrobatic moves to defeat the foes and become the master by learning special moves. With addictive mechanics, superb gameplay, and wonderful visuals, War of the Monsters is the best game to play and enjoy.

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7. Tekken 7

Tekken 7 focuses on Action, and Fighting element developed and published by Bandai Namco Entertainment. It is the ninth entry in the long-running series of Tekken and introduces new stages, characters, and items. There are a set of characters such as Katarina Alves, Lucky Chloe, Shaheen, Saudi Arabian, Gigas, etc. and the game supports both Single and Multiplayer modes. To get into the game world, the player has to select his hero and fighting against other rival characters to complete the match. Each character has its unique story, fighting style, combo, and skills. The game focuses on the one-on-one battle and includes two new mechanisms such as the first and Rage Art. Each stage consists of two levels and offers different environment. The game goes tougher as the player progress through it. The player has to avoid enemy attack using block features and attack opponent using the skills. With enhanced mechanics, addictive gameplay, and superb visuals, Tekken 7 is the wonderful game to play and enjoy.

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8. J-Stars Victory Vs

J-Stars Victory Vs is a 3D, Fighting, Single and Multiplayer video game developed by Spike Chunsoft and published by Bandai Namco Entertainment. The gameplay of the game is inspired by the favorite game of Dragon Ball: Zenkai Battle Royale in which the player can fight against the opponent player. It allows the player to move in the all direction on the battlefield. It offers several characters, and each character has its own unique abilities and fighting behavior. The game allows the player to choose his best character and get into the battlefield to use his skills as best into the world. A defeated player can come back after a set amount of time to fight again. J-Stars Victory Vs offers new multiple story mode that consists of four different campaigns in which the player can explore the game world, fight against the multiple opponents and gather power-ups cards of his characters. The game also includes core features such a different modes, unlock new characters, upgrades, different power-ups, and upgrades, etc. With immersive and quite addictive gameplay, enhanced game mechanics, objective storyline and brilliant visual details. J-Stars Victory Vs is an excellent fighting game as compared to the other same genres.

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9. Injustice 2

Injustice 2 is an Addictive Fighting, Single and Multiplayer video game developed by NetherRealm Studios and published by Warner Bros. The game introduces new Gear System, a loot dropping system that rewards the player with the pieces of costume and equipment that can be used to modify his characters. The game returns lots of gameplay mechanics from the previous installment Injustice: Gods Among Us such as location interaction, clashes, stage transition and character traits. It offers various character, and each character of the game has its own abilities, powers, and attacks. At the beginning of the game, it allows the player to choose his character and get into the game world to prove himself as best in the world. Each winning game will provide huge rewards that will help the player to unlock more content and upgrade his character. Injustice 2 includes core features such as different modes, various locations, character customization and much more. The game offers enhanced game mechanics, quite addictive gameplay, well-written storyline and beautiful visual details.

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10. Marvel vs. Capcom: Infinite

Marvel vs. Capcom: Infinite is a Fighting, Single and Multiplayer video game developed and published by Capcom. It is the sixth installment in the series of Marvel vs. Capcom that offers both Marvel Comics and Capcom Universes. In this game, the players can battle against each other in fast-paced tag team combat. The game features two-on-two battle system in which the player can control two characters once at a time. During the gameplay, the player is able to create a combination of his partner combos and attack on the opponent characters. The player can switch between the other characters at any time in during the battle. Each character of the game has its own abilities, attack, and fighting behavior. Marvel vs. Capcom: Infinite also offer key features such as multiple Modes, lots of upgrades, unlock new characters, different background theme and lots of other exciting things, etc. The game offers Ultra-HD visual details, addictive gameplay, and enjoyable background music.

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11. Dragon Ball: Xenoverse 2

Dragon Ball: Xenoverse 2 is an Action, Role-playing Fighting, Single and Multiplayer video game developed by Dimps and published by Bandai Namco Entertainment. It is a sequel to the original game of Dragon Ball: Xenoverse that offer similar gameplay with the new 3D battle arena and modes. It takes place in the Dragon Ball universe in the Toki-Toki City also called Canton City. The game contains various Dragon Ball characters choose one of them and get into the challenging game world where the player can battle with his friends or computer opponent. Dragon Ball: Xenoverse 2 introduce new character customization options that allow the player to create his custom character with one of five given classes such as Humans, Majins, Namekians, Saiyans and Frieze’s race. Each one has its own abilities and powers. Different location, various modes, unlock a new character, exciting ki blasts and lots of upgrades, etc. With immersive and quite stunning gameplay, enhanced mechanics and smooth controls. Dragon Ball: Xenoverse 2 is an excellent Role-playing Fighting game to play and enjoy.

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12. Dragon Ball FighterZ

Dragon Ball FighterZ is a 2.5D, Fast-paced, Fighting, Single and Multiplayer video game developed by Arc System Works and published by Bandai Namco Entertainment. The game is based on the Dragon Ball franchise and available to play on multiple platforms such as Xbox One, PS4 and Microsoft Windows. The gameplay of the game borrows concepts from multiple other fighting games mainly Marvel vs Capcom series which player select three characters to form a team. One character is played and can be switched with one of the other characters at any time. The game also allows the player to call one of the other characters to perform an Assist move allowing combo attacks against the entire team. In order to win the game, the player must defeat all of the opponent’s characters. Also, as the player progresses, he collects Dragon Ball one by one. Dragon Ball FighterZ includes core feature such as multiple characters to choose, multiple backgrounds them, tournament mode, and unlock new characters etc. The game offers enhanced mechanics and improved visual details. Try it out.

More About Dragon Ball Z: Budokai Tenkaichi 3

Dragon Ball Z: Budokai Tenkaichi 3 is a Fighting, Single and Multiplayer video game developed by Spike Chunsoft and published by Atari. The game is based on the anime and manage Dragon Ball series and offers all characters. Each character has its own abilities, attacks and fighting behaviour. At the start of the game, the player can choose his favourite character and get into the challenging game world to show his fighting skills. In battle, the player needs to up his Ki gauge to execute multiple techniques such as combo and power attacks. The game has set of matches, and in each game, the aim of the player is eliminate his opponent character in given amount of time. Dragon Ball Z: Budokai Tenkaichi 3 feature several modes such as story modem Z Battle Gate, Dragon History, Power Mode and Dragon Adventure etc. Each mode of the game offers more challenging and complicated gameplay of the last one. Dragon Ball Z: Budokai Tenkaichi 3 also provides core features such as different theme, unlock new characters, play against his friend and day and night cycle much more. The game provides enhanced mechanics, well-written storyline and beautiful visual details. Do try it out, you’ll surely enjoy it.